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Artist Statements                                                             


Original child's "stick-men" drawing


Black & white print derived from drawing


Color print

 


'Family Album Hieroglyphics'

When I first became involved with printmaking, I was totally involved with my young children. Our family took many trips in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico and Arizona. We hiked through the canyon lands and visited many unusual rock formations, Indian cliff dwellings, pueblos, and petroglyphs. The impact of these primitive sites and textural landscapes with their intense colors played a major role in the development of my artwork.

At the time, there was a direct relationship between the primitive "stick figures" my children were drawing and the petroglyphs and landscape textures I was photographing.

The symbiosis of these two elements formed the basis for the 'Family Album Hieroglyphic' series. I have always had a fascination with other primitive art forms such as Egyptian hieroglyphics and Indian petroglyphs and liked the symbolism and story telling involved.

The intense emotions evoked in the children's artwork validated many family and cultural issues that are commonplace to everyone. Fears, friendship, loneliness, ethnic and gender issues, strife, pets, holidays, sports, and celestial configurations were captured in the simple, yet complex renderings. By combining the primitive drawn images and the textural photographic backgrounds, I created images that tell multiple stories with a sense of depth and compassion.

My process involved using my children's artwork which I modified and transferred to mylar. In addition, I collaged large photographic film positives of rocks, petroglyphs, cliff dwellings, and other textures. These transparent images were exposed onto zinc plates, and then etched. Some of the plates were then cut into shapes. Illustration board plates (cut into multiple corresponding pieces like a puzzle) were used to create the multiple background colors by relief roll. All were printed on an etching press, using Arches paper. Edition sizes vary from 1 10. Some images are monoprints and contain collagraph and relief imagery as well.  

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2009 Linda C. Everson, All Rights Reserved